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The Draft is Dead, And the Miami Heat Killed It | The Afro-American Newspapers | Your Community. Your History. Your News.

 

 

 

 

 

The Draft is Dead, And the Miami Heat Killed It | The Afro-American Newspapers | Your Community. Your History. Your News.

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July 12, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lakers and Celtics Brace for Epic Game 7

Just another battle for a magazine cover as the Lakers prepare to take on the Celtics in Game 7 of the NBA Finals (courtesy photo).

It’s come down to a coin flip for the NBA Finals. When the Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics tip off Game Seven on Thursday night, it’ll be just the third time since 1994 that the NBA Finals has required a deciding game. And for the NBA and its fans, they wouldn’t have it any other way.

After a second consecutive failed attempt at a Lebron/Kobe Finals matchup, the league was delighted to settle for an old school brawl between Boston and Los Angeles. The Lakers and Celtics remain as the two best teams in the NBA, headed for a one-game elimination to settle the score for the championship title. Perfect!

Despite both clubs dealing with key injuries to their starting center positions, plenty of star power remains for Thursday’s game in what could turn into a record breaker for viewership ratings.

You know it’s Lakers-Celtics, the biggest rivalry in NBA basketball, seven games. It is what it is,” Boston point guard Rajon Rondo told Boston.com when asked about Thursday’s title clincher.

Multiple sources have already confirmed that Celtic center Kendrick Perkins will miss Game Seven after spraining his knee on Tuesday. With Perkins out for the Celtics, the Lakers will probably have to endure another injury-riddled effort from starting big Andrew Bynum. Bynum has gutted it out so far through the Finals with a knee injury but left the second half of Game Six after complaining of stiffness in his leg. With a championship on the line, Bynum is fully expected to give it one more go.

Boston will be expected to give it one more go after a poor performance in Tuesday’s 89-67 loss. The Celtics were outrebounded 52-39 and scored just the second-lowest point total in NBA Finals history. But Game Six for the Celtics is exactly that at this point, history. With their eyes focused on Game Seven, Boston will be expected to lay it all out on the line for the last time this season.

“To me, the game (Game Six) is over,” Rondo told reporters. “We have one game (left). They have one game. All or nothing. (Game Six) is in the past.”

If the Lakers and Celtics’ past is any indication, Los Angeles could be in trouble. The Lakers and Celtics have played in four Game Sevens over the course of their 11 previous Finals matchups, with Boston winning all four. Although the two clubs haven’t played in a deciding final game since 1984, Boston still owns the edge in the series 9-2.

While the Celtics have the history, the Lakers have Bryant. The four-time champion will try to extend his ring count to five with a win and further add to an already stellar legacy. But maybe more important than adding to his hardware collection will be inducing confidence to a Lakers team that has appeared rattled at times during the series.

“We’re used to being in must-win situations,” Bryant told reporters. “The way we look at it, (Game seven) is just a game we’ve got to win. I know what’s at stake but I’m not tripping.”

Bryant doesn’t have to “trip,” the NBA’s fan base will be head over heels for Thursday’s Game Seven; The league’s ultimate elimination game between a pair of the league’s ultimate franchises.

“This is what it’s all about,” Glen “Big Baby” Davis told reporters. “This is what you guys are going to talk about for years. You guys are going to remember this moment. You are going to remember Thursday forever. I can’t wait. I can’t wait to step up on the floor and win here in L.A.”

Confidence at its strongest. Perfect for a NBA Finals series at its most storied.

June 16, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Celtics’ Reserves Campaigning for more Playing Time Despite NBA Politics

The play of Celtics reserves Nate Robinson and Glen "Big Baby" Davis in Game 4 of the NBA Finals should warrant more playing time (Courtesy Photo)

You have to commend Boston coach Doc Rivers for not giving into politics during the Celtics’ 96-89 win in Game 4 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night. With reserves Glen “Big Baby” Davis and Nate Robinson providing electricity off the bench, Rivers had a chance to pull the plug on the show midway through the final period but declined. As he should have.

With Lakers center Andrew Bynum tied to the bench with a knee injury, Rivers wasn’t up against the size disadvantage that he’s faced throughout the first three games of the series, meaning his shorter reserves like Davis (who’s outplayed starting forward Kevin Garnett at times throughout this year’s playoffs) were able to see extended minutes. Bynum’s knee injury going forward could and possibly should result in more minutes for Davis. He’s the only Boston big who appears content with attacking Los Angeles downlow and rather bang than settle for a jumpshot.

But while a vote for extended action for Davis is obvious, Robinson also deserves to be in the running for an increased workload. His perimeter shooting opens up the court for Boston’s half court offense and allows one-on-one specialists Davis, Garnett, Paul Pierce and Ray Allen more room to operate in isolation. It’s clear that Robinson is no where near the playmaking point guard that Rondo is but the long distance shooting and scoring that Robinson provides over Rondo is unmistakable.

Before Thursday night, Rivers had played Rondo 40, 42 and 42 minutes through the series’ first three games and received modest but unconvincing numbers from his star point guard. Aside from a 13-minute, scoreless performance in the Game 1 (where the whole team played poorly), Robinson has given the Celtics 24 points in just 29 minutes of playing time in the last three contests. Even Senators haven’t campaigned harder for more face time than Robinson has this past week.

It remains questionable why Rivers hasn’t ran more of a Rondo-Robinson backcourt at times, especially when Lakers coach Phil Jackson is playing some combination of Shannon Brown, Sasha Vujacic and Jordan Farmar as his guard set. While Rondo and Robinson are both small in stature, they play bigger than their size, collecting rebounds and blocking shots (Robinson’s block on Dwight Howard in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference finals was athleticism at its finest).

Rivers’ reluctance to play the 6-foot-8 Davis heavy minutes against Bynum and Pau Gasol through the first three games was understandable but his reluctance to play Robinson however is something he’ll need to rethink going forward. Now that the complexity of the series has changed drastically with Bynum’s availability for the remainder of the series in serious doubt, it should allow Rivers to be more creative with his bench. Robinson, Davis, Tony Allen and Rasheed Wallace played fantastic during Game 4 and have played solid overall during the Finals as well.

If Garnett, Ray Allen, Rondo and Pierce continue their inconsistent play, Rivers should continue to avoid NBA politics and rely on his reserves if he wants to avoid losing the 2010 championship election.

June 11, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Celtics’ Reserves Star in Leading Role in Game Four Win over Lakers

Glen "Big Baby" Davis carried Robinson and the rest of the Celtics down the stretch in Game 4 of the NBA Finals (Courtesy Photo)

The movie “A-Team” doesn’t premiere until Friday but it was the Celtics’ “B-Team” that was starring on Thursday night. Boston reserves Glen “Big Baby” Davis and Nate Robinson provided the scoring while Rasheed Wallace and Tony Allen added the defense to help the Celtics beat the Los Angeles Lakers 96-89 in Game 4 of the NBA Finals and even the series 2-2. With starters Rajon Rondo and Kevin Garnett struggling, Robinson and Davis combined for 30 points, exciting the crowd with momentum sparking plays and timely baskets.

Davis, 18 points, took advantage of a depleted Lakers frontline, wrestling with reserve forward Lamar Odom for four offensive rebounds and nine fourth quarter points. A foul and continuation on Davis’ basket with 8:22 remaining prompted Robinson to hop upon Davis’ back as the “Big Baby” drooled for the camera with excitement. With Laker center Andrew Bynum limited to 12 minutes after aggravating his knee in Game 3, the 6-foot-9, 290-pound Davis was the heaviest man on the floor down the stretch and it showed. The Celtics outrebounded the Lakers 41-34 and doubled Los Angeles on the offensive glass 16-8.

Kobe Bryant scored 12 of his 33 points in the final period but was limited to just two points for much of the quarter until sinking a free throw with 2:50 remaining. By the time Bryant scored his third point of the period, Allen’s defense on Bryant down the stretch had helped the Celtics turn a 62-60 deficit at the start of the fourth into an 85-78 lead. Wallace’s defense on Laker power forward Pau Gasol may have been even more impressive than Allen’s. Wallace limited Gasol to only four points in the quarter before leaving with 1:16 left after falling on his already ailing back a few plays earlier. Celtics’ coach Doc Rivers went with the bulk of his “B-Team” deep into the final period until Garnett, Rondo and Paul Pierce returned to put Los Angeles away for the final 2:50.

Pierce scored the next five points and Rondo stole a pass and finished a layup to put Boston ahead 92-84 with 31 seconds remaining. While the Celtics’ bench was emulating a group of ’80s fictional heroes, it was the Lakers who were reenacting their own real life movie. Bynum’s absence in the 2008 NBA Finals helped Boston punish Los Angeles up front and win the series 4-2. With Bynum stationed on the bench the majority of Game 4, it was the first time all series that the Lakers have failed to post double digit offensive rebounds and block less than seven shots in a game, finishing with three.

Despite limited action, Davis, Allen, Wallace and Robinson have played well throughout the Finals as Rivers has given heavy minutes to his first team. With his starters playing inconsistently throughout the first four games, Rivers may be forced into using his “B-Team” more as his “A-Team” down the stretch of games similar to what he did Thursday night. It certainly worked in Game 4.

“We just knew we had to bring our energy, that’s the main thing for us,” Robinson told reporters about his reserve unit’s play. “The more energy we bring, the better offensively we are and the better defensively we are.”

June 11, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hold the Hoopla: Bynum Reinjures Knee in Lakers Win

Sandwiched between reserve forward Lamar Odom’s revival and Derek Fisher’s clutch shooting in the Los Angeles Lakers’ 91-84 win in Tuesday night’s Game Three of the NBA Finals was Los Angeles Lakers center Andrew Bynum hobbling to the bench in the third quarter. Bynum reinjured his already faulty right knee twice in the quarter, reducing him to just four minutes in the final period.

Bynum later told reporters he reaggravated his knee while chasing down a loose ball and landing from a block of Boston Celtics center Kendrick Perkins. Bynum’s presence through the first three games of the Finals has been huge for the Lakers but his remaining availability going forward has the potential to reshape the whole series.

“It’s going to be a little questionable Thursday,” Bynum told reporters after Game Three. “There’s a lot of swelling in there because of the couple of little tweaks I got today. What I’m going to do is attack it all day [Wednesday], probably get three treatments in and then take it from there.”

Before limping to the bench, Bynum still managed a respectable nine points and 10 rebounds. His appearance in this year’s Finals has given the Celtics all kinds of problems thus far, evident by his Game Two performance of 21 points and seven blocks. Bynum is averaging 13 points, 7.3 rebounds and 2.6 blocks in the series despite playing only 32 minutes per game. His presence alone has made for a clear difference from this year’s Finals and the Celtics and Lakers 2008 matchup when Bynum was out with an injured knee.

During Bynum’s absence in ’08, the Lakers were forced to move starting power forward Pau Gasol to center and Odom to power forward, where the more physical Celtics dominated Los Angeles on the interior. Although the Lakers went with the same lineup down the stretch on Tuesday, they were fortunate to have raced to a 17-point first half lead—aided by Bynum’s presence— that Celtics had to battle back from.

Los Angeles was also fortunate to have received a positive game from Odom as the versatile reserve posted 12 points and five rebounds and came up with key baskets down the stretch. But Odom has been inconsistent so far this series and a possible absence by Bynum or his limited availability could put Los Angeles back in a familiar position. The same position that resulted in a 4-2 Finals win by Boston two years ago.

June 9, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Despite Series Split, Lakers Frontcourt Dominating

The Boston Celtics evened their series with the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday night courtesy of a dominant performance from their backcourt. Highlighted by Ray Allen’s endless three parade and Rajon Rondo’s triple double, the Celtics’ starting guards combined for 51 points, 15 rebounds, 12 assists and connected on 9-of-12 shooting from beyond the arc. While the Celtics were able to escape Los Angeles with a 1-1 series split, concern has to be brewing in Beantown.

Maybe even more impressive than the performance of Boston’s backcourt was the play of the Lakers’ frontcourt of Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum. Los Angeles’ twin towers dominated for the second game in a row, tag teaming for a 46-point, 13-block effort.

The Lakers’ length has definitely been giving the Celtics trouble inside and it really showed on Sunday. Most troubling for Boston is that the matchup between Gasol and Kevin Garnett has been largely one-sided so far. Gasol exposed Garnett in both games at the Staples Center, going off for 48 points, 22 rebounds, nine blocks and six assists compared to Garnett’s 22 points, 10 rebounds and seven assists.

There was a point in time when Garnett’s two-game total would’ve been generated in one outing but that time seems ages ago at this point. Garnett’s Game Two effort of six points and six rebounds was badly overshadowed by Gasol’s 25-point, eight-rebound and six-block display. Even Bynum added 21 points and controlled the Celtics’ half court offense for much of the night with seven blocks. Bynum’s presence has been in full effect in both games so far but his showing in Game Two was nothing short of brilliant.

Allen’s hot hand was key for Boston because his long distance attempts were the only shots that Gasol or Bynum were too far away from to swat down. But unless Allen can keep up the flawless jumpshot sessions, the Celtics can ill afford to continue to be dominated in the frontcourt battle.

Allen’s a great shooter but his otherworldly precision shouldn’t be expected to continue throughout the series and Boston head coach Doc Rivers may have a crisis developing with Garnett’s sudden slump and reserve forward Rasheed Wallace’s inspired play.

Rivers could’ve easily played Wallace in favor of Garnett down the stretch of Game Two and probably would’ve avoided much criticism. Garnett had been a walking corpse until the final period before rewarding Rivers with a strong finish and helping the Celtics coach avoid a crucial decision for another night at least.

One of Boston’s best traits during their three-year run has been their collective selflessness. The Celtics have no problem taking advantage of whatever matchup that’s working in their favor. They don’t force-feed a bad matchup for the sake of getting a guy on the stat sheet, that’s not their M.O. The ability to attack with either their frontcourt or backcourt is one of the luxuries that the team has enjoyed in eight of the 10 playoff series they’ve been in since ’08.

The few times that the Celtics didn’t have that luxury were against Orlando in the ’09 semifinals and now. Boston lost that series against Orlando as their starting power forward/center combo of Perkins and Glen Davis (who was subbing in for an absent Garnett) was upstaged by the Magic’s Rashard Lewis/Dwight Howard combination as Orlando won the last two games of the series.

The Celtics frontcourt has been outplayed again so far in this series but they have a 1-1 split to show for it. But Boston also led Orlando 3-2 before eventually succumbing to the Magic’s matchup advantage and if the Celtics starting bigs don’t play light years better in Boston, a similar fate could be in store.

June 7, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Soft” Gasol Too Strong for Celtics in Opener

A 30-point game from Kobe Bryant was to be expected. A 15-point, two steal performance from Ron Artest; no surprise. It was Pau Gasol — the same player who received much criticism from his 2008 NBA Finals performance— that provided the unexpected in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night. Gasol’s 23 points, 14 rebounds and three blocks set the tone for the Lakers inside in their 102-89 win, a far cry from the power forward/center who was called “soft” after the Celtics manhandled him two seasons ago.

“I thought the Lakers were clearly the more physical team today,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said in the postgame press conference. “I thought they were more aggressive. I thought they attacked us the entire night. I didn’t think we handled it very well. They killed us on the glass.”

Physical is a word that has eluded Gasol since that fateful ’08 Finals meeting when the Celtics pushed and powered him out the way on their way to a 17th title. Gasol was barely into his fifth month with the Lakers after being acquired from the Memphis Grizzlies earlier that season in February. Two years later, Gasol, 29, is well versed in the Lakers’ triangle offense and 1B to Bryant’s 1A in terms of importance to Los Angeles’ success.

But just how important is Gasol? The facts tell more than just the whole story. After Shaquille O’Neal was traded to the Miami Heat following the 2003 season and the three championships he helped bring to Los Angeles, the Lakers slumped to a 149 -141 regular season record over the next three and a half seasons. The Lakers missed the playoffs once and were ousted in the first round in two consecutive seasons before Gasol’s arrival. Since trading for Gasol, Los Angeles is 130-37 in the regular season with him in the lineup and Thursday night marked their third consecutive NBA Finals appearance.

On Thursday night, Gasol, with the help of gimpy center Andrew Bynum (who missed the ’08 Finals with a knee injury), proved their worth against the supposedly more physical Celtics. The Lakers outscored Boston on second chance points 16-0. Outscored Boston in the paint 48-30 and held a 42-31 edge in rebounds. Gasol matched the Celtics’ top four big men in rebounds by himself 14-14. If the Lakers’ bigs are supposed to be “soft,” they certainly didn’t show it in the series opener.

If Gasol continues to post 23 points, 14 rebounds and three blocks a game during his third Finals run, the Lakers will be in good position to win their second consecutive title and critics may eventually have to think about relabeling Gasol. That “soft” moniker appears to be wearing thin these days.

June 4, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pick One; L.A. or Boston?

The Lakers and Celtics are set to tip off this Thursday for the 12th time in NBA Finals history. Boston owns the edge in the series with a 9-2 record and the Celtics fully expect to extend that mark by one more at the conclusion of the title round. But Kobe Bryant and the rest of the Lakers are the defending champs and will be heading into this rematch of the 2008 Finals with a little redemption in the back of their minds.

Maybe the telling sign of an excellent matchup is the varied opinions on who the winner will be. The AFRO sports desk has been at it all week over who will close the 2009-2010 season as NBA champions. Stephen D. Riley says Boston. Perry Green says Los Angeles. The AFRO says read their back and fourth debate.

SDR: Celtics will win in six games. Boston’s defense has been unbelievable so far this postseason. They’ve dealt with big time scorers LeBron James and Dwayne Wade and contained superstar big men past and present in Shaquille O’Neal and Dwight Howard. They’ll formulate a gameplan to contain another terrifying wing scorer in Kobe and limit Pau Gasol, just like they did in 2008. Boston’s rotation is 10 deep and it’s full of defensive-minded guys with things to prove. The Celtics have the size and toughness to make things problematic for the finesse Lakers.

PG: The Celtics may have the tools to beat the finesse version of the Lakers but this isn’t 2008 and L.A. isn’t exactly a soft push over anymore. Boston may have contained Shaq and Howard but neither of those “supermen” can score the rock as well as Gasol can.  There isn’t a better scoring big man in the league than Gasol, who will be able to play his natural power forward position, unlike 2008 when he was forced to center due to an injured Andrew Bynum. With Bynum on the court, L.A. has two 7-footers to match up with the Celtics’ size. Not to mention 6-foot-11 star Lamar Odom will offer support off the bench while Ron Artest, the best perimeter defender in the NBA, will make the Lakers a very tough team to beat. Lakers win the series in seven games.    

SDR: The thing that makes Los Angeles so tough is their twin towers in the middle with Bynum and Gasol but Bynum (just like in 2008) is hobbled with a knee injury. His minutes have decreased in each round of the playoffs from 29.7 in round one, 24.8 in round two to a paltry 18.2 in the Western finals. A gimpy knee against a physical Boston team spells trouble for Bynum and the rest of the Lakers. Kevin Garnett has the offensive game to attack Gasol in the post and get him in foul trouble. If that happens then the Lakers’ strength suddenly becomes a weakness and if Odom has to defend Garnett and/or Rasheed Wallace in the post on a regular basis it could become a long series for L.A, 2008 all over again.

PG: But there’s a difference between not playing at all and simply playing banged up. Bynum was completely absent from the 2008 Finals but trust and believe he will play this time around. And with an opportunity to help L.A. seek revenge from ’08 that may be enough motivation to mentally overcome his banged up knee and get the job done. Let’s not forget Paul Pierce was the hero of the series in ’08 but this time he’ll be guarded by either the very physical Artest or Bryant. Both are as good as it gets at defending swing forwards, which gives L.A. an advantage.

SDR: There’s also a difference between playing major minutes and being a liability. You would be wishing upon a star to expect Bynum to contribute anything significant in this series. Yes, his presence will help to provide a big body but he won’t be out there in the stretch of the game and he won’t be out there in the closing minutes of the game. Artest or Kobe checking Pierce could limit Boston’s main scorer but this is Rajon Rondo’s team now and the Lakers don’t have a point guard on the roster who can contain him. Bryant checked Rondo exclusively in ’08 but he won’t have that luxury again. Boston goes as Rondo goes and he flat out annihilated Jameer Nelson and Mo Williams (All-Star point guards in ’08) and he’ll do the same to Derek Fisher and Jordan Farmar.

PG: I agree, Rondo is the real deal, and may be the best overall player left in the postseason besides Kobe. But that still shouldn’t worry the Lakers. Fact is, L.A. has eliminated the Suns, Thunder and Jazz, three teams with three excellent point guards. Some would argue that Jazz guard Deron Williams is the best point guard in the league and Steve Nash is a two-time MVP. Fisher had to defend both of them just to get to this point and was embarrassed at times by their excellent skill. Yet L.A. still survived, nonetheless, mainly because of one player: Kobe Bryant. The “Black Mamba” has been playing in a league of his own the entire playoffs, scoring at least 30 points in 10 of the last 11 games. The man simply cannot be stopped on his quest of stamping his legacy as perhaps the greatest player in Lakers’ history. Good luck on trying to halt him, Boston. They’ll need it. 

SDR: Fisher was carved up repeatedly in the first three rounds but the Lakers survived because of mitigating circumstances. The Thunders’ lack of experience, the Jazz’s lack of healthy bodies and the Suns’ lack of defense. Boston will come equipped with all three elements plus a point guard who can attack. Plain and simple, the Celtics are built to beat the Lakers; an attacking point guard, a slew of tall defensive minded big men who can shoot and draw Gasol and Bynum away from the rim and a pair of scorers in Pierce and Ray Allen who can make Bryant work throughout the course of the series. Kobe ‘s been playing out of his mind so far this postseason but he hasn’t had to work defensively. All three of Boston’s primary scorers could make life miserable for Bryant. Allen will run him off screens and Pierce will make him work while Rondo will attack with his speed.

PG: But Kobe doesn’t mind working. He had to work defensively against the great scoring of Kevin Durant and also had to work to stop excellent scorers like the Suns’ Jason Richardson and Grant Hill. Like Boston, the Suns also played tremendous defense down the stretch of the postseason, a prime example being their dominance against the Spurs during the Western Conference semifinals. But L.A. still prevailed. Point is, this series will be tightly competed and both teams have a great shot at winning it all. But my money is on the defending champs.

May 31, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Seems Like Old Times, Celtics/Lakers Set for Rematch

The shorts are a little longer, the names a little different but the Celtics and Lakers are still the highlight of the league. (Courtesy Photo)

Thanks to a rejuvenated Kevin Garnett, we can do without a pair puppets and a possible Kobe/LeBron matchup because we’ll be getting the next best thing; Boston vs. L.A. No disrespect to Orlando and Phoenix but let’s be serious; it’s all about the Lakers and Celtics this year, again. It’s typically out of my character to just write teams off in the middle of a series but why not? Everybody else is doing it. I couldn’t wait to get a crack at previewing this series, with so many twists and plots, it should be another great one.

So if Boston and L.A. do eventually matchup for the 12th time in NBA Finals history, things should be pretty interesting. Despite the historic brilliance of both clubs, the Celtics/Lakers Finals series has been pretty one-sided so far. Boston owns a 9-2 edge in the series with their last victory coming in 2008 when visions of a Boston comeback, a Boston blowout and Doc Rivers being doused with Gatorade defined the series. But things could be different this time around. Or could they?

After all, Pau Gasol is a better player, Kobe Bryant is still Kobe Bryant and the rest of the Lakers are more experienced and better equipped to scrap with a rough and rugged Boston squad. But Boston is also sporting a different look these days. Gone is the dominance of the “Big Three” and in is the superstardom of All-Star point guard Rajon Rondo. Rondo’s emergence has continued the Celtics’ image of a lock and block defensive unit while upping the tempo and transforming them into a fast-paced drive and dish team.

The Lakers have had a history of being openly victimized by athletic point guards and a new defensive game plan will have to be in order for a Finals rematch. Bryant exclusively locked up with Rondo in the ’08 Finals in an effort to give him a rest on defense and out of chasing Boston sniper Ray Allen off screens. But Rondo was nowhere near the scorer in ’08 that he is now so Bryant typically gave him an open cushion and the green light to launch jumpers. While perimeter shooter still isn’t one of Rondo’s strengths, it would be a huge mistake for the Lakers to put Bryant on him again should the teams meet. Rondo has stamina to burn while Bryant, 31, is nowhere near the thoroughbred he used to be. But L.A. will be in a tough position regardless because putting Derek Fisher on Rondo will be just an open invitation to the rim for the Celtics point guard.

Bryant will have more help next time around should his Lakers meet up with the Celtics (Courtesy Photo/AP-Yonhap)

There’ll be a lot of clashes in this possible series to keep note of; Ron Artest vs. Paul Pierce and Gasol vs. Kevin Garnett will both weigh heavily on the outcome but Boston doesn’t have a man to check Lamar Odom off the bench and with the way Odom is playing right now, the Celtics will definitely have to key on him.

Everything about this series screams television viewership records from the names on the front of jerseys to the ones on the back. No other teams are hotter right now than the Lakers and Celtics. Los Angeles has turned into a scoring machine while Boston has been the premiere defensive unit of the postseason.

It shouldn’t be long now, just have to wait for Orlando and Phoenix to lie down and let history take its course. The last two NBA Champions set to slug it out in what could be the last hurrah for both clubs. Kobe vs. LeBron would’ve been nice but who needs puppets when you got the Celtics and Lakers?

 

May 20, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Warming up to Orlando

Ok, Ok, so I’m slowly starting to warm up to last June’s blockbuster Vince Carter trade. Although there has been several articles written bashing, trashing, and smashing the move, I’m beginning to see the silver lining in all of this.

While I do agree that Carter is a bit too much on the 30ish side for my liking and though I wish the team could’ve held on to promising youngster Courtney Lee, I guess my oppurtunistic side rather focus on the pros instead of the cons of this deal. I don’t know about the rest of you, but seeing coach Stan Van Gundy and Orlando’s once prolific offense grinded to an anemic halt by the more athletic Lakers in June’s Finals made me flat out sick.

Watching the pick-and-roll ran over and over and over again until I got tired of seeing the Lakers defend it better each and every time was tough to process. I give credit to the purple and gold defense because Los Angeles reduced the once effective staple of the Magic’s offense into a useless ineffective gimmick.

By the time game five rolled around, Orlando’s quality of shots out of the pick-and-roll had gone from good to simply “Stan would you please stop running this (expletive)!”

But that was the sickening part about it. Orlando couldn’t stop running that “expletive” because no one on the roster was qualified to get his own shot off.

Since his innaguration season in 2007. Van Gundy has inherited a talented but tainted roster. He’s been fortunate to acquire a vast array of scorers but the vacancy for a playmaking ballhandler has been an open position on advertisement for the last couple of seaons now.

The club has tried to promote from within but their list of employees haven’t been the best qualified for the position.

Turkoglu's lack of athleticism often left him unsuccessful on his forays to the cup

Turkoglu's lack of athleticism often left him unsuccessful on his forays to the cup

Not Jameer Nelson, not Hedo Turkoglu, not Lee, not Mickael Pietrus, not Keith Bogans, not J.J. Reddick, not Trevor Ariza(yes, that Trevor Ariza), not Keyon Dooling, and definitely not Rashard Lewis.

Thus, Van Gundy installed his version of the Magic pick-and-roll base offense and ran it to the max down in Orlando. Quite genius on his part, but also quite redundant and quite easy to defend by top notch defensive teams with the right personnel.

Don’t get me wrong, Nelson, when healthy, is an All-Star caliber point guard with the quickness and mindset to get to the cup. But hovering around the 6-foot inch line means more times than not, it’s difficult for him to get his shot off against bigger opponents.

Turkoglu, the 6-foot-10 Turkish Michael Jordan, was the closest thing that Van Gundy had to a playmaking ball handler so he drew up the offense to feature the silky shooting small forward as his centerpiece. A three-point sniper equipped with loads of craftiness, Turkoglu embraced his new role well and the Magic rode their gimmicky offense all the way to the NBA Finals last year.

For everything Turkoglu was to Orlando, what he was not was the guy who could free himself from defenders without the aid of the pick-and-roll and it was never more evident than in last June’s championship series. Seeing Kobe slice and dice his way to the cup and create for his teammates only highlighted the Magic’s major offensive weakness.

Vince Carter may not be the athletic wonder he used to be, but his ability to drive to the basket will certainly appease Orlando

Vince Carter may not be the athletic wonder he used to be, but his ability to drive to the basket will certainly appease Orlando

Introducing Carter, the former one man highlight reel brought in last June to possibly replace Turkoglu as Orlando’s go-to-guy. At 32, Carter can still play—and at a pretty high level if needed. Though critics suggest he’s lost much of his athleticism, let’s be honest here, whatever athleticism Carter has left is still more than what Turkoglu has possessed at any point-in-time in his underrated career.

While critics will argue that Turkoglu is able to play the point and distribute to his teammates, I deny this claim to full detail. Turkoglu is an unselfish player and can throw the lob ball pretty well. But make no mistake about it, Orlando’s system was not predicated upon him running up the court, crossing over and slicing into the lane, dishing no look style to Howard while the defense collapsed on him.

The Magic’s system was a scheme-orientated plot designed to compensate for the lack of a penetrator by making it easy for players to pass to the open guy provided top option Dwight Howard was covered on his bull rushes to the basket. Think I’m joking? Rashard Lewis, a career 1.9 assist man, has had more assists the past two seasons under Van Gundy than he’s ever had in any two-year period of his 11-year career.

In his last four games against the Lakers in the Finals, Lewis dished out seven,five,four, and four assists as the pick-and-roll was ran nonstop to counter Los Angeles’ lock down defenders who had the perimeter covered heavier than a hypothermia victim.

While we’re at it, we might as well dispel another myth. So Carter’s a ballhog they say? Last year in New Jersey—a dry land in terms of talent outside point guard Devin Harris—Carter averaged 4.7 assists per night. Surrounded by more assassins than a Mexican Cartel, Turkoglu barely edged out Carter with only 4.9 dishes a night. Keep in mind that Carter played with a true point guard in Harris while Turkoglu ran with a true gunner in Nelson, making Hedo the primary ballhandler and reducing Vince to a secondary ball carrier.

Need more proof? Since the 2006-2007 season, Turkoglu’s first full time season as a starter, he has averaged 4.38 assists per game while running with third rate point men from Keyon Dooling to Carlos Arroyo to Travis Diener while Orlando has compiled a 151-95 record over that time span. During that same stretch, Carter has averaged 4.86 dimes a game while playing alongside the likes of top tier talent at the point in Harris and Jason Kidd compiling a 109-137 record over in Jersey.

You would think the more successful the team, the lower the caliber of lead guards, the more assists that would pile up right? Wrong! To whom it may concern, this article is not an attempt to bash Turkoglu, but if the Magic are going to substitue Carter in place of Turkoglu, this article only serves as a means to say Carter will be an effective upgrade into an offense devised on scheme.

Add in the facts that Carter can create his own shot without help from a pick and is a legendary strong and acrobatic finisher at the rim, and Orlando’s offense may actually be better than it was last season.

Let’s get to the real benefit of Carter’s addition. Since his introduction into the executive office down in Florida, Orlando general manager Otis Smith has made a lot of savvy moves. If there’s one move Smith would probably like to have back, it’s breaking the bank on the one-dimensional Lewis to the ransom of $100 million plus.

Lewis’ 6-11 frame encouraged Van Gundy to play him at power forward but you don’t pay a sweet shooter over $100 million and play him out of position against down low bangers. Although Dwight Howard is a superman when it comes to blocking shots and rebounds, even Superman had his share of sidekicks.

The addition of Bass gives Superman the help he sorely lacked in last year's Finals

The addition of Bass gives Superman the help he sorely lacked in last year's Finals

The Magic needed a power forward to take the stress off of Howard and relieve him of his do-everything-on-the-block duties that he’s excelled in the last couple of years, but going up against the Lakers’ band of bigs was a task to tall for the former slam dunk champion.

Turkoglu’s lack of athleticism meant he couldn’t move over to the two-guard slot full time to make way for a true power forward but Carter’s insertion into his natural shooting guard role means a move back to the three for Lewis, where he thrived at in Seattle and it also relieves the slender forward of his low post defensive mismatches. The Magic can still run the same spread-em-out lineup if they like by inserting Pietrus at the two and letting Carter and his 220 lbs run at small forward with Lewis drawing power forwards away from the rim.

Perhaps the biggest bonus in the Carter deal is that it gets Orlando off the hook from the five-six year deal that Turkoglu was seeking and places them responsible for only two more years of Carter’s current four-year contract that he signed in ’07. With Carter coming off the books in 2011, it provides the Magic with several options: They can let Carter’s contract run out and go after another shot creating perimeter player through free agency, or they can move Carter when he enters the last year of his deal for a disgruntled young perimeter player or several players.

Carter has a team option for $18 million after the fourth year of his deal, which will more than likely not be picked up by any team. His salary in the 2010-2011 season will circle around $17.3 million, a pretty enticing number for a team looking to clear some cap room, making the Magic a possible heavy trade contender for the 2010 season.

While the loss of Tony Battie along with Rafer Alston as part of the deal may hurt the Magic’s depth, keep in mind that Orlando picked up a similar sweet shooting big man in Ryan Anderson, who’s range actually surpasses Battie up to the three-point line. Also remember that forgotten point man Anthony Johnson outplayed Alston as the team’s lead guard during several stretches in last year’s post season.

The Vince Carter trade was not the end to Smith’s summer wheeling and dealing. The Magic were officially in the hunt for a power forward and nabbed one in Dallas’ Brandon Bass, a 24-year-old underrated athletic banger with major upside while retaining the overvalued “Polish Hammer” Marcin Gortat to backup Howard.

Adding Matt Barnes will certainly add to the Magic’s depth, and it gives them a versatile swing man to help continue the stretch-the-floor-method that was ran with Hedo Turkoglu. It also provides Orlando with another long range bomber while Lewis serves a 10-game suspension to start the year.

While the Magic may have overhauled their roster, the pieces they added makes them arguably one of the deepest teams in the East if not the deepest. Cleveland and Boston will certainly be formidable, but an enhanced post game from Howard and a healthy Nelson to go along with the surrounding pieces should make Orlando the team to beat in the East.

August 12, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment